Second The Best ! #bloggersbash

Congratulations to ‘But I Smile Anyway…’

But I Smile Anyway...

Today was wonderful and I can’t believe it’s already over 😥

I am most proud and extremely thankful to those of you that voted…
I got second place in my Category Best Overall Blog Award!

There were some huge blogs I was up against so I was so amazed!

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Still speechless… (well as gobsmacked as a chatterbox like me can!)

Still, I phoned my Hubby Dearest to let him know the good news and he was so happy for me, and my Lil Man and Lil Princess were jumping up and down, because “You know mummy, second the best!” followed by “Did you get anything??!!”

I said I got lots of claps and cheers, and a tee-shirt!

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And I was lucky enough to also win a bracelet from Barb Taub!

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I regret that I took hardly any photos but there are a few of my core blogily Erika,Judy and

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Heroes of the Revolution: Sylvester

Art by Rob Goldstein
Sylvester

Sylvester James, Jr. (September 6, 1947 – December 16, 1988), was the first openly gay recording artist to gain international fame.

His first hit, Disco Heat, peaked at #19 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the fall of 1978.

It also reached #29 on the UK Singles Chart.

Sylvester was born in Watts, Los Angeles, to a middle-class family.

He first sang as a child with the gospel choir of his Pentecostal church.

Sylvester knew that he was gay while still a child.

At the age of eight Sylvester had sex with an older man.

His Mother could not accept his homosexuality and neither could his church.

He left the church because the congregation disapproved of his homosexuality and he found friendship among a group of cross-dressers and transgender women who called themselves The Disquotays.

He moved to San Francisco in 1970 at the age of 22 where he found acceptance and fame.

“I’ve never been a crusader, but I’ve always been honest. I may not volunteer details to the media, but I’ve never believed in lying or denying what I am to anyone.” Sylvester, September 10, 1988

The English journalist Stephen Brogan described Sylvester as “a star who shined brightly. He only happened once. He was a radical and a visionary in terms of queerness, music and race.”

Sylvester was a man of integrity and courage and that courage is clear in this interview with the Los Angeles Times in September of 1988:

Sylvester learned three months ago that he has AIDS, and he has spent most of the last few weeks at home, trying to regain his strength.

While often plagued by fatigue, the singer, 40, was well enough last June to lead a gay pride parade in San Francisco, albeit from a wheelchair.

“I can’t walk very well anymore,” he said in a phone interview. “I have problems with my feet and sometimes the pain is unbearable. But I don’t like to take pain killers because of the side effects.”

Despite the physical setbacks, Sylvester insists that his outlook remains positive.

“I’ve been in situations I shouldn’t have been in. We all have. But I still think that I’m a good person and I don’t regret anything I’ve done in my life,” he said.

“Down the line, I hope I won’t be in a lot more pain. But I don’t dwell on that. I’ll be fine, because my spirit is fine.”

Sylvester says that while black people are 12% of the population, more than 25% of all reported AIDS cases in this country involve blacks.

“It bothers me that AIDS is still thought of as a gay, white male disease,” said the singer, who has long been openly frank about his homosexuality.

“The black community is at the bottom of the line when it comes to getting information, even when we’ve been so hard hit by this disease. I’d like to think that by going public myself with this, I can give other people courage to face it.”

Sylvester, who rose to international fame during the late ’70s with such disco hits as “Dance (Disco Heat)” and “You Make Me Feel Mighty Real,” had been hospitalized three times before being diagnosed as having the AIDS virus.

“I’d been having throat problems and I thought it was bronchitis. I wasn’t worried. Having AIDS hadn’t even crossed my mind.”

Since that time he has spent five weeks in a hospital with pneumocystis, during which time he confronted his own mortality. “I was ready to go,” he said. “I made peace with that and I never thought, ‘Why me?’ I just accepted it.”

Disco Singer Sylvester Confronts AIDS Without Any Regrets

Sylvester died in his bed on December 16, 1988.

For a more complete biography of Sylvester I recommend this one at  Pop Matters.

Sylvester with Patrick Cowley: Don’t Stop
Community Audio

Can’t You Just Pretend To Be Nice?

if you’re not: molesting, abusing, being racist, getting all mass murdery, killing serially or non-sequentially, making human skin coats, terrorizing, stealing, lying, raping (yes, creepy, horrible Stanford rapist and any other rapists, no still means no and to clarify, unconscious also means no; not difficult to understand), you probably still qualify as ‘nice’, but hopefully we can try to raise the bar way, way higher.

yadadarcyyada

Can't You Just Pretend To Be Nice?Life is choosing. Choosing to be happy or sad. Nice or mean. Hopeful or hopeless. Among the mass of expectations, concepts, beliefs, abstractions, and stereotypes swirls millions and millions of choices. We’re not always going to make the right choices. Sometimes we’re mean and feel sorry, sometimes we’re sorry we’re not more mean.

I recently rewatched Josie and the Pussycats, the movie, although I loved the cartoon also – https://yadadarcyyada.com/2014/08/09/i-miss-saturday-morning-cartoons/ – it reminded me:

1) It’s hilarious, even 15 years later, maybe more so;
2) It’s wise, especially about how we’re brandwashed, er, brainwashed;
3) The words to the song echo through my head, “Can’t you just pretend to be nice, can you at least pretend to be nice, if you could just pretend to be nice, then everything in my life would be alright.”

Can't You Just Pretend To Be Nice6

For me, people who pretend to be nice are pretty much as annoying as meanies…

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How abusive people – view abuse. Apaths, Egocentrics, Narcissists, Sociopaths, Psychopaths. ~ Lilly Hope Lucario

(What abusive people have in common) are a complete lack of empathy, conscience, remorse, guilt, shame, or regard for human suffering. And a complete sense of entitlement and deep selfishness.

Healing From Complex Trauma & PTSD/CPTSD

abuse quote

Apaths – I can’t be bothered to be concerned about abuse. Who cares. Boring. I know people who say they are being abused. I ignore it. Not my problem, is it? And I like that person they said was an abuser.

Egocentrics – Abuse doesn’t affect me, so why should I care? They should deal with their own problems behind closed doors and not bother others. Now can we get back to my problems.

Narcissists – I think it’s fine to use people, treat people badly, then lie, deny, project, if you need to. That’s life. Everyone does it. Don’t criticise me, or I will have a tantrum and deny it all. And if all else fails, I’ll act the victim, whilst starting a vindictive smear campaign.

Sociopaths – I do plan exploiting and hurting others, because I think it’s funny to watch people get upset. It’s not my problem…

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