“The Sweet Essence Of Giraffe”: Song A Day Challenge – Day #2

from Bradscribe

Bradscribe

Manic Music Monday: Welcome To The Song a Day Challenge!

Thank You ToDanica For Nominating Me!

Here are the rules:

  • Post a song a day for five consecutive days (I’m posting consecutive Mondays!)
  • Post the name of the song and video
  • Post what the lyrics mean to you (optional)
  • Nominate two (or one) different blogger each day of the challenge

My Song of the Day:

The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band – “The Canyons Of Your Mind” (1968)

“Oh, I can’t get it together!” – Viv Stanshall.

What the lyrics mean to me:

During the ’60s, Viv Stanshall and those crazy boys of the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band maintained that tradition of eccentric English humour richly expressed by the likes of Peter Sellers, Spike Milligan, Monty Python et al.  

This particular ballad is a traditional olde English ditty; nothing substantial is known about its origins, but it is believed to have been originally…

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An Interview with Harold Norse, Part 1, Section 3– Saints and Self-Destruction

I ask Norse about his drive to write poetry.

He feels like a man without category.

He is not from the élite and he is not entirely of the poor.

He is not working class but he is not rich.

Norse was 53 in 1969, the year of the Stonewall Riots.

He was 60 when he published Carnivorous Saint and became
the poetic voice of the gay liberation movement.

Norse discusses recently published letters he received as a
young writer from W.H. Auden.

Auden advised Norse to accept the locked doors of the
literary world as a sign of his true calling in life as a saint.

Screenshot of an of W.H. Auden's letter to Harold Norse from the Contemporary Authors Autobiography Series in which Auden tells Harold Norse to accept locked doors ihn the literary world as a sign of his true callling as a saint
A section of W.H. Auden’s letter to Harold Norse from the Contemporary Authors Autobiography Series

When Norse speaks of a politically correct left, he means an academic
élite that restrains the use of a certain kind of language even when it’s
essential to the work.

Section 3 of the interview closes with a question of identify:

“It seems to me that you’re making more than a writer when you take
an illiterate and give him the ability to express himself with a self
conscious understanding of his real social and political position. That
is an extremely powerful thing to do and it can be devastating.”
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Interview with Harold Norse, Part 1 Section 3- Saints and Self Destruction

 

Scan of a typewritten note from Hal the Difficult to Rob the Impossible concerning a vast tureen of nearly finished chicken soup in the refrigerator
An interoffice memo left on the fridge one day.

An Interview with Harold Norse, Part 1 section 2:  The Pain of Becoming Literate

An Interview With Harold Norse, Part One, Section 1: The Art of Teaching
Header image is a flyer for a production of Bobby.  The figure is a shaman.

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A Handful of Sand

from The Bag Lady

The Bag Lady

He wanted to be clear. As he watched the waves bringing in the sand and shells, then retrieving them in a constant repetitive motion, his mind thought of their relationship. He needed to tell her that he could not do it. He couldn’t sacrifice everything he’s worked for, his family, his lifestyle, even for her. Whoever said love conquers all was mistaken. Not even the love he felt for her, the compassion, the longing, want, need — none of these combined could win. He had been trying for a long time, it seemed, to ultimately be down to this. It wasn’t only a matter of giving up, even though that would be an uneasy performance in its own way. It was impossible. So much for that old saying, too. Who were these people, making statements that inevitably prove untrue? Is it so unrealistic to believe them, count on them…

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TH1RT3EN – Remember Me

Just found this on Twitter — 13 speaks for millions.