digital painting of a man disintegrating in an explosion

“Nothin’s gonna be the same.”

At 8:45 AM I was in class to help my teacher get the classroom ready
for the day; I was seven and it was my turn to help with morning chores.

My teacher was in a dither because ‘colored kids’ were coming to school
that day.

Mrs. Sullivan furiously scrubbed the blackboard and muttered under her
breath about ‘niggers’.

I’d never seen any colored kids but heard lots of them lived in
Charleston.

Mrs. Sullivan and I opened the windows so we could clap chalk out the
erasers when through a haze of white dust we saw the first colored kids
arrive at my school.

I smiled and raised my hand to wave but Mrs. Sullivan grabbed my wrist.

Below us, a crowd of white parents formed a barricade with their
kids in front of the entrance; all of them had stones.

The black kids looked scared and paused on the playground, their
parents behind them.

A white man shouted, ‘Go home niggers!’

Then all the parents shouted and threw stones.

A big stone hit a little black girl in the face.

She fell backward and cried.

I felt sad.

I didn’t understand.

White folks said colored people liked their lives.

They said people get along best when they know
their place.

They said colored people want to know their place.

The little black girl’s mother scooped her up and carried her away.

Mrs. Sullivan had tears in her eyes so I asked her why and here is
what she said:

“Nothin’s gonna be the same.”

Rob Goldstein (C) 2018

Rob Goldstein (C) 2018

27 thoughts on ““Nothin’s gonna be the same.”

    1. Thanks for the comment and for noticing the political point. Most reasonable adults don’t think we should abuse children and yet we institutionalize child abuse when we accept racist arguments and allow racists to set the national agenda. I always appreciate your visits and comments.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I know EXACTLY what you mean. I don’t share my opinions on my blog for those reasons. I’m glad to have created a safe place with an author friend on
        FB where we share our opinions in a private group. If you’re on FB I’d be happy to invite you in. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Mrs. Sullivan’s world where everyone happily knew his pre-assigned place was ending and rightly so. I have no patience for institutional racism and social systems that allow adults to abuse children. Vicious adults beget vicious. Most of the children who were there that day are in entering their 60’s now.

      I have never lived in a more vicious community and left it as soon as I turned 18.

      Thank you for your comment, Paula.

      Like

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