Book Review: No More Mulberries by Mary Smith

A thoughtful review of ‘No More Mulberries’ by Mary Smith

This Is My Truth Now


No More MulberriesNo More Mulberries by Mary Smith
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

No More Mulberries is an international contemporary drama written by Mary Smith and published in 2009. The story focuses on Miriam, a Scottish midwife, who has married two men from Afghanistan during her lifetime. The tale unfolds by jumping time frames across different chapters to share the reasons why Miriam’s life has become what it is today. At times, her days have been heartbreaking, and at others, they have been an admirable source of strength. I chose this book because I’d seen many positive reviews and it fit the parameters for my month of international and/or autobiographical reads. Let’s chat more about this complex and wonderful story…

Miriam had a wonderful husband and life, but he passed away. She had a young son to raise in Afghanistan during a difficult period in the country’s history, especially for a…

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Guest Writer Spot

Robbie Cheadle on Transitioning from a non-fiction to a fiction writer

estherchiltonblog

This week’s Guest Writer is the very talented Robbie Cheadle. As you’ll see from her biography, she’s a very versatile writer:

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with six published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. 

Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton…

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Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore Update – #Reviews – Annette Rochelle Aben, Barbara Silkstone, Walter Rhein

Reviews from Sally’s Cafe

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Welcome to the second of the Cafe and Bookstore updates this week with recent reviews for authors on the shelves.

The first author today is Annette Rochelle Aben with an early review for her recently released collection of poetry – Think Tanka.

About Think Tanka

Throughout time, the poet has used words to convey feelings, share ideas and unite the reader with their vision. Think Tanka uses the traditional structure of Japanese lyric poetry to unite the reader to the vision of the poet. if you can “see” what she is trying to “say” in every grouping of 31 syllables, then she has done her job. Think Tanka is a book for those who appreciate poetry, those who enjoy short reads, people who like to smile and those who know what it is like to be lost in a world of imagination. Whether you are buying this book for yourself…

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Trina: Trina’s New Doll

Trina pulled a bench out of her bag and sat by the duck pond in Central Park.

She rested her chin on her hands and watched a little yellow duckling scurry
after its mother.

I want a new dolly, thought Trina, but I want one like me.

“What does that look like?” asked Trina’s doll, Madison.

Trina pulled Madison out of her bag.

“She’s just like me, but taller, and with breasts, because she’s a grown up.”

“Why is she a grown up?”

So she can do grownup things.”

“Like what?”

Trina gazed at the duck pond and thought.

Madison giggled, “Tits don’t make a gown-up!”

Trina was shocked.

Madison snickered and grinned.

Anjana the elephant slowly lumbered out of the pond.

He lifted his mighty trunk and gently plucked the little yellow duckling from his back and released it find its Mother.

‘My friends,” he bowed.

Madison swiveled her head and frowned at Anjana: “Trina thinks she’s all grown up if she has…”

Trina grabbed the doll and stuffed it into her bag. “Breasts,” she said sweetly.

Arjuna nodded thoughtfully and flapped his ears. “I’m no hominid, but I think it takes more than breasts to be a grown-up human. Why do you want to be a grown up when you’re such a perfect little girl?”

Trina pulled out her tea set and a freshly baked plate of scones; she poured out tea and replied. “I want my new dolly to be a grown-up.”

“Why?”

“Because my world needs grown-ups.”

“We elephants are very grown up.”

“Really?” said Trina. “What kind of grown up things do you do?”

Anjana sipped his tea and thought.

“We never eat more than enough.”

“Neither do I,” said Trina.

“We remember things forever and ever.”

“So do I,” said Trina.

Anjana cocked his head and thought. “We always bathe once a month.”

Trina was horrified. “Adults only bathe once a month?”

Madison cackled: ‘oh no!”

An Illustration of the chatracter Trina, designing a doll from wood
Trina made her doll from snakes and snails and puppy dog tails.

Trina made her doll from snakes and snails and puppy dog tails.

She fluffed its hair and primped its dress.

“Are you terribly grown up or grown up terribly?” she asked.

The doll opened its eyes and replied, “I’m terribly grown up.”

“How often do you bathe?” asked Trina.

“Twice a day!” answered the doll.

“For how long do you remember things?”

The doll gazed up at Trina and blinked.

“For no time at all,” she replied.

Trina smiled at her new doll and offered her a cup of tea.

An Illustration staged in virtual reality depicting the character of Trina designing an adult doll
Are you terribly grown up or grown up terribly?

(c) Rob Goldstein 2019

 

Trina’s New Doll inspired by a series of #photoprompts from D Wallace Peach.

‘The Demon Dolls’ in these images are designed by Sebastian Prince