#Politics: Trump’s Dystopia

Over 200,00 Americans have paid with their lives for the sins
of trump’s corrupt enablers.

I will never understand why the people who betray us
expect us to love them for it.

This post is now available at DemCastUSA.

Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
CVS pharmacy boarded up on Haight and Fillmore, June 26, 2020
A tent on 17th Street, Sept 2020-
A tent on 17th Street, September 2020-
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
Fillmore Street, October 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
A row of tents on 16th Street, September 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
The San Francisco Civic Center and City Hall, September 23rd, 2020
A photograph of stickers on Valencia Street
Stickers on Valencia Street October 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
A drawing of George Floyd on a shuttered business on 7th Street
16th Street July 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
Tents at 16th and Dolores Streets, August 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
Dolores Street, October 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
A drawing of Icarus on the plywood on the windows of a closed business in Hayes Valley August 4, 2020
A drawing on plywood on Market Street
A drawing on plywood on Market Street
Tents on Dolores Street, Sept 2020
Tents on Dolores Street, Sept 2020
Tents on Dolores Street, August 23 2020
Tents on Dolores Street, August 23, 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
History lessons on a garage on 18th Street August 4, 2020
A photograph of a sign that reads frab them by the ballot box
A photograph of a sign on Fillmore Street October 6, 2020
Clarion Alley August 23 2020
Clarion Alley August 23, 2020
Photographs of San Francisco during the #Covid-19 Pandemic
‘Have Hope’ – The Bus Shelter on Fillmore at Haight

All photographs were taken between August and October in San Francisco.

(c) Rob Goldstein 2020

56 thoughts on “#Politics: Trump’s Dystopia

  1. Rob, it’s all so heartbreaking that such an evil monster is permitted to still be there. You know my sentiments. I can’t even imagine living under his rule with all the lunatics he has unleashed. I have friends afraid to put out Biden signs. I’ve read articles of instruction for voting – keep your head down and don’t lock eyes with anyone. WTF kind of dystopia! Latinos afraid of being snatched by ICE gestapo and blacks getting killed because of their color. Top it all with Covid and it’s all surreal and frightening. The blue wave is in process, everyone needs to vote bigly! โค

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve seen them around the UK, too, Rob. The number of food banks and people using them has rocketed over the last few years in the UK. Many of the supermarkets allow you to donate to food banks when shopping. I always make sure not to forget the animals as well, so pet food is often donated to them by me.
    I hope you’re taking care, Rob. Has the smoke from the wildfires now disappeared from over the city?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the reply, Hugh. It’s unnerving to see corporate looking people living in tent communities, and if our press wasn’t so distracted by Covita and her balcony scenes, I’m sure we’d hear more about them. The smoke comes and goes. We’ve had a couple of good air days in San Francisco, but the smoke is back. Fortunately, I have an air purifier that alerts me to changes in air quality. There’s an app for everything. Enjoy this version of ‘Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” for the Lincoln Project. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks Robbie. This is our problem. There is a lot we can do. We can start by ending minority rule and voting trump out of office. Those are upper middle class people in those tents and they are homeless because our president is a sick malignent narcissist. My guess is the people in those tents have enough contacts and resources to make their homelessness temporary. I hope I’m right.

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  3. These pictures are so gut-wrenching. Where I live, I see the occasional homeless person and I always give them some money. When it gets colder here, Iโ€™ll take quilts to them. Someone put a quilt on my son when he was on the street. He still has it.
    I know a quilt isnโ€™t much but I feel like I owe.
    Iโ€™ve often thought that is the hugely wealthy people would just give a small portion to those less fortunate, it would make a world of difference.
    So very, very sad.

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    1. Thank you Laurel. This is not the same kind of homelessness. I have never seen a row of brand new tents lining the streets of one of the most prosperous neighborhoods in the City. Many of these folks look like they’ve recently lost jobs and housing. Some of them also have newish looking cars. We are clearly in a rather undiscussed economic downturn which seems to have hit the tech industry, which may be why this is happening in San Francisco. All of us need to vote this year, for ourselves and for each other.

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  4. I love seeing artwork express so many feelings and opinions: Anger, defiance, and hope. I live near Portland, OR, and we have lots of tents on the streets. Perhaps that’s exactly what needs to happen in order to make people start noticing. Great post, Robert.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for leaving a comment, Diana. Portland is another city in pain. I think Americans need to see the street-level impact of the Trump Administration’s policies, primarily because our press usually frames these policies as ‘political strategies.’ Trump’s decision to use ‘racism’ as a ‘political strategy’ has an immediate impact on marginalized people of color. The GOP Senate’s refusal to vote on a second stimulus package means more shuttered businesses, more evictions, and more people living in tents. It is enraging that the political party in control of the Senate refuses to act as a check on an out of control president who has a lethal personality disorder that makes him unfit to serve. I also think part of the reason Americans are so divided is we no longer understand or accept each other’s pain. In fact, our president promotes a toxic brand of positive thinking that assumes everyone has access to the same resources as the most powerful man on the planet. Americans can accept the things we cannot change and change the things we can, but we have to learn the difference. We can change our government’s policies by voting, not just for ourselves, but for each other

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes. I’m excited by the Coalition for Biden. . Biden represents a non-partisan consensus among liberals, progressives, moderates and conservatives. Progressives would like a more progressive candidate and former republicans make it clear that they are not voting for his policies. We’re voting for Democracy because that’s is the question on the ballot. Trump represents an extremist minority that wants to bully us into accepting minority rule. I sincerely hope the people of the United States decide in november that we’re not having it. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  5. That’s a lot of tents. Your photos are beautiful, but very disturbing (as I’m sure you meant them to be). I thank heavens that as rough as things have been in my area of the country, at least we don’t have people living in tents on the city streets – at least none that I know of. I’d like to think things will be changing soon (overly optimistic, I know), but meanwhile I manage to keep my own cupboards stocked and give some to the local food pantry when I can.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s jarring to see people form tent communities on one of the wealthiest streets in San Francisco, and it looks as if some of them have the residents’ permission. It seems as if San Francisco is in the middle of an economic collapse. I also hope things change this November. I do not want to live in a Russian-style oligarchy, mainly because I don’t know how to shut my mouth. ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you for noticing the effort I put into the photo. I knew the images weren’t pretty, so I tried to make them effective.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. That poster of beheading Trump was sickening. Reminds me so much of the radical justice that we see from those who hate this country. I’m saddened that anyone would think that is acceptable behavior even in times of stress.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. I agree with you, John. I had mixed feelings about posting this Image but went ahead with it because I see my job in this post as being a ‘kind of’ journalist. Our president lies to us and causes endless months of death and economic suffering; he also treats California like an enemy nation, which results in policies that compromise and threaten our lives, so I can understand how frustration and rage might cause someone who feels powerless to make such a shocking and angry image. I hope he or she decides to vote this year. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The hatred behind that poster is my concern. There is no way to justify the vitriol it represents. In America we don’t systematically cut off people’s heads. (Yet) The same cannot be said about the rest of the world where such crimes are common place.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I agree with you, John. What I find noteworthy about this Image is the rage. I’ve never seen this level of anger directed at a president before, not even Nixon. The ugliness and brutality of this Image are dystopic, which is the topic of the post. I see the graphic as part of the history of this time. My prayer is that the United States will come together and heal, that the people in the tents in these photos will find safety, and that we will be wise in our vote. More than anything, I want the suffering to stop. Thank you for your comment, John. I do understand and respect your opinion.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Rob, we should congratulate Trump for having his own COVID-19 cluster, which is now up to 34 people. It is the best cluster in the history of clusters, I could hear him say. No one has more important sick people in his cluster than I do. That shows how important I am he might say….

    Or, he might find of interest 2/3 of Americans have said the president has mishandled his own personal (and that of his staff) COVID-19 virus. And, 60% have said he has mishandled COVID-19 overall. I still wonder why it is only 60%, since he has purposefully mislead people and still is. He might find of interest that mocking your staff for wearing masks, when the work in close proximity is an example of why the Trump White House has so much turnover. Keith

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve never seen domestic violence at the highest levels of government, Keith. The most telling moment in the debate was when Chris Wallace tried to make an abusive trump ‘happy’ with a question he would like. It’s frustrating and disgusting.

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    1. I posted these images as a warning, Jan. None of us deserves to lose our homes and lives to a government that lies to us and refuses to do its job. We can change this by voting blue this year, not because we agree with all of Joe Biden’s policies, but because America is better than this. I’m looking forward to my weekly Tarot reading. ๐Ÿ™‚

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      1. New Mexico has always been a very poor state (though with a strangely disproportionately high number of PhDs — but that’s from Los Alamos labs). We lost the major festivals and tribal events that bring in tourist money and support hotels and related industries. I don’t leave my house, so I don’t know what it looks like in the bigger cities. But a friend in Albuquerque talks about experiencing increased aggression when he’s out and about, and more homeless… It’s heartbreaking everywhere. Stay safe and well.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. There is increased aggression. I was in Safeway yesterday when a large gang of kids carrying metal rods marched into the store to shatter locked shelves and load up their bags with deodorant, mouthwash, and other items to sell on the Black Market. These kids knew exactly how much time they had before the police would arrive. Thanks to COVID, the response time is longer. I have never seen anything like this before. A young woman hid behind me. When I asked if she was OK, she said it reminded her of Brazil. That they went for deodorant and other hygiene products backs up my perception that the latest homeless are newly homeless and trying to keep it together because that’s the only way they’re going to escape it. Thanks for the visit and the comment Teagan.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I know what you mean, Dan. It’s not to be liked. I posted these photos because I think it’s essential for people in different states to see how the Trump Administration’s policies affect their fellow citizens’ lives. I have a friend who lives in New London. He tells me Connecticut is doing reasonably well. It’s the rotten luck of Californians to have a series out of control wildfires and weeks of unhealthy air on top of a pandemic. We weren’t prepared for five weeks on unlivable air quality. And it doesn’t help to have a president who treats us like enemies.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I normally skip political posts, Rob, but this was compelling. CT is doing good with the virus, but we’re going to lose a lot of businesses. We are supposed to go to 75% in restaurants tomorrow. We’re still doing takeout, although I can sit at the bar and order. I hope I feel safe doing that on Saturday.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I know alot of people don’t like politics, but the impact of politics on our lives is so profound, so I appreciate the fact that you stayed. I have decided that I can’t believe anything the federal government says right now. My own approach to the virus is to treat is as lethal and easily spread. So it’s life in limbo until we get leaders we can trust with our lives.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thanks for the reply, Dan. I have no interest in different kinds of doors, but I’m glad you are interested in them because I get insight into a different way of seeing the architecture I tend to take for granted. I’m also happy for those times when I can visit your blog and enjoy your photography and your beautiful dog. The images in my post reflect a portion of what’s going on in my part of the States. I’m sharing my world; it’s political because the political impacts of the trump’s Administration’s policies are felt more profoundly in San Francisco, right now. I started going out for walks in June. If I wash my hands and wear a mask, I can go out whenever I want to without getting sick. A mask really really is almost as good as a vaccine.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Mary. While the republican senate drops everything to stack our courts with religious fanatics the people are losing their homes, their families and their lives. It’s enraging and I sense that rage when I take my walks around the City. I hope you’re staying well. Mary. I worry about you. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m doing all right, thanks, Rob. Next chemo on Friday and then about ten days later a scan to see if it is working and shrinking the tumour. I have my kick-ass boots polished and ready for Friday ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Ivor. I noticed the economic and emotional impact of Trump’s chaos as soon as I resumed my walks around the City in June. The homelessness is different. Homeless people In San Francisco usually donโ€™t have assets like tents and new bicycles because homelessness because they are usually disabled. The people in the tents appear to be newly evicted. There is an undercurrent of rage in the City.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Hugh. They look like they belong to newly homelesss people who’ve lost their apartments but still have enough cash and credit to buy tents and transportation. I first noticed this in June when I saw a bright blue tent on Fillmore Street with a collection of freshly dry cleaned suits draped over the roof. I’ve never seen this kind of homelessness. It’s different from the elderly and disabled I normally see on our streets. I see the same thing in the lines of people waiting to get into the food banks; they’re younger and better dressed. It suggests the United States is in the middle of an under-discussed economic collapse.

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