‘Fiction In A Flash Challenge’ Week #20 NEW Image Prompt! Join in the fun! #IARTG #WritingCommunity #FlashFiction #ASMSG #WritingPrompts

poetry from Jan Sikes

Writing and Music

Author Suzanne Burke posts a new writing prompt in the form of an image each week and the responses are absolutely amazing!

 Each week she features an image and invites you to write a Flash Fiction or Non-Fiction piece inspired by that image in any format and genre of your choosing.  Maximum word count: 750 words.

This is my contribution. I want to give you a little background on this poem. When my late husband was dealing with such a difficult physical decline, during one of the many hospital stays, he developed pneumonia and I feared he might not live until morning. I held vigil throughout that long night and this poem came to me. I remember searching for pen and paper to get it down, and I remember the tears that fell as I scribbled it. I felt that I had to give him permission to let go and…

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At a time of division, wise words from Nelson Mandela

Great minds are always relevant:

“I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being an optimist is keeping one’s head pointed towards the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many moments when my faith in humanity was surely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.” Nelson Mandela – Long Walk to Freedom’

My Life as an Artist (2)

“I am fundamentally an optimist.   Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say.   Part of being an optimist is keeping one’s head pointed towards the sun, one’s feet moving forward.     There were many moments when my faith in humanity was surely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair.    That way lays defeat and death.”    Nelson Mandela – Long Walk to Freedom’

Portuguese woman – 201620-11-15 - 1 (199)As a portrait painter, I have been fortunate enough to work with people of all ages, nationality, faith and gender from around the world.

Quentin – Brittany, France – 1995P1150314

What I have learned is that we are intrinsically the same.    We have the same needs, hopes  and fears.

Young girl – Mission Hill School – Boston – 2013

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When we look at life only through the lens of different…

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The City of Dreams- Fiction in a Flash Challenge #writingcommunity #amwriting #flashfiction

Some fantastic #FlashFiction by Jacquie Biggar

Jacquie Biggar-USA Today Best-selling author

Fiction in a Flash Challenge

Suzanne Burke came up with this inspiring weekly challenge. Read more and join in here

The City of Dreams

The iconic Hollywood sign was more garish in the bright California sun than Beth expected. She’d dreamed of this moment for so long, it didn’t seem real.

She reached for her cheap Polaroid camera, hesitated, then shrugged and quickly snapped the photo before the tour bus chugged out of the view point. Her parents might not care, but her young sister, Sara, would. She’d begged to come with Beth, but their father wouldn’t hear of it.

“If your sister wants to run off and get herself into who-knows-what kind of trouble, that’s up to her. She’s old enough to do what she wants. But you ain’t, and I say you’re not going anywhere.”

Yep, that was dear old Dad. Cripes, would it be so hard for…

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#MentalHealth: Ten Tips for Blogging With DID

I’ve learned a few things about blogging with Dissociative Identity Disorder in the years since I first posted this.

I’ve learned that most people can’t and won’t understand DID; the people I want in my life are the people who try.

I’ve learned that I do not owe anyone an apology for the DID, nor do I need other people to validate my diagnosis.

I’ve learned that when I’m confused and don’t know what to say, I say nothing.

I’ve learned to understand and accept the limits of what I can accomplish with DID; this is not giving up, it’s acceptance, and with acceptance, comes peace of mind.

I’ve learned that DID makes me vulnerable to online Narcissists. One of my personal rules is to avoid relationships in games like Second Life.

Here are my top 10 tips for blogging with DID.

  1. Never apologize for speaking your truth.
  2. Learn as much as you can about your illness
    and triggers and keep learning.
  3. There are jerks on every platform: ignore them.
  4. Take responsibility when you are wrong.
  5. Avoid making commitments you can’t keep.
  6. Never leave a negative comment on someone’s blog.
  7. Thank people when they visit your blog.
  8. Be grateful for your followers.
  9. Always treat other bloggers with respect.
  10. Be yourself, especially when you seem improbable.

Rob Goldstein 2016-20192020

“Respect” (C) Rob Goldstein 2016

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