#SaturdayMorning: Eleanor Roosevelt reads Peter and the Wolf

This is a delightful reading of the story of Peter and the Wolf from one of America’s greatest First Ladies.

PROKOFIEV: Peter and the Wolf

by Serge Koussevitzky, conductor
Eleanor Roosevelt, narrator.
Boston Symphony Orchestra.
Serge Koussevitzky, conductor.
RCA Victor 10″ Lp LM 45.
Recorded August 3, 1948.
Digital transfer by F. Reeder

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0

Found at the Internet Archives

 

Tell Me a Story Robert M Goldstein

I’m honored to have a podcast up on Annette Aben’s blog. The podcasts are in alphabetical order: http://themagichappensnow.com/tell-me-a-story-with-annette-rochelle-aben/

Annette Rochelle Aben

 He is a multi-faceted man of many talents and we have him on Tell Me a Story today. Welcome to the podcast, Robert M. Goldstein

 Spend some time talking with Rob and you’d be hard pressed to find something else you’d rather do. Spend time listening to Rob share what’s on his mind and heart and you’ll be inspired. This presentation is filled with the though provoking, unplugged energy of a truly passionate man.

Visit his BLOG and you can spend hours getting lost in art,  writing collaborations, mental health support and so much other reasons to follow Rob Goldstein.

Thank you for enjoying and sharing our podcasts Tell Me a Story

*Remember, all our podcasts are listed in alphabetical order

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He Said, He Said

He called as he usually did, his voice sexy and deep, not hysterical, which
he can sometimes get when something’s on his mind, something I have to
ferret out, burying my muzzle in the shit of his psyche.

He said we couldn’t have dinner, that he was broke and, ‘some people have
to work,’ implying something about my life.

He said that I was fine, but, ‘a little too much’ and wondered if I wouldn’t
be happier with someone ‘more complex, more my ‘speed.’

And I said no! No! Simplicity is my goal, what can I be?  What would you
like me to be?

“Nothing.” he said, and hung up.

(c) Rob Goldstein 1986-2017 All Rights Reserved

He Said, He Said

Excerpt from a poetry reading with Harold Norse, 1986.

 

An Interview With Harold Norse, Part One, Section One: The Art of Teaching

In 1992, I interviewed my friend and literary mentor, Harold Norse.

I moved in with Norse in July of 1984 and moved out in August of 1989 .

Scan of the Harold Norses Signature in my copy of Carnivous Saint
Norse signed my copy of Carnivorous Saint a few months after I moved in with him.

I spent two years in Los Angeles where I did some free-lance writing
for the gay press.

I moved back to San Francisco in the spring of 1992 and invited Norse
over to see my new digs in the Tenderloin.

Norse and I spontaneously decided to do an interview that turned into a
frank discussion of the work we did together as student and teacher.

Most people in San Francisco’s gay lit scene thought my relationship
with Harold Norse was sexual; it wasn’t.

We had a passion for each other, but it was not sexual.

In retrospect, we had an affair of the intellect.

There is a rhythm to the interview as Norse and I adjust to our relationship
as equals.

In this first section, we discuss who I was when we met and how Norse approached the task of being a teacher.

There is a moment of silence as Norse reads a short poem by someone
I was teaching.

I open this section of the interview by mentioning the power of his poems
Karma Circuit and Addio.

Scan of Addio from Karma Circuit, 1965, by Harold Norse
Addio by Harold Norse

When Norse and I mention ‘The Cottage’, we are discussing a two-bedroom cottage on Albion Street in San Francisco’s Mission District.

Photograph of Fall leaves on Albion Street
“Get the unconscious going without fear of criticism.” Harold Norse, 1992, on writing.

An interview with Harold Norse Part 1, Section 1, The Art of Teaching

To hear part two click here.

Interview and photograph of Albion Street (c) Rob Goldstein 2017 All Rights Reserved

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