Another “Rosie” Story

Do you know the story of Rosie the Riveter?

Pacific Paratrooper

Ruth & Ben Reise

When Ben Reise went to enlist in the military in 1942 during World War II, his future wife, Ruth Fern Gibb, went with him. The two had grown up together in Chicago, meeting in grammar school.

Ben Reise tried to enlist in the Navy, but they told him that he was too short at 5 feet, 4 inches, Ruth Reise said. Next, he went to the Army, which “took him right away.”

At the same time Ben enlisted, Ruth was also offered a job. Her height – 5 feet even – made her the perfect size to climb into airplane gas tanks to secure the rivets. Soon after, she began working at the Douglas Aircraft manufacturing plant, on the site where O’Hare International Airport is today.

From 1942 to 1945, Douglas manufactured 655 C-54 Skymasters, a military transport aircraft, at the Chicago plant. A photo from…

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This is What a Christian Looks Like

“Dr. Martin Luther King was pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, when he was twenty-five years old, in 1954. As a Christian minister, his main influence was Jesus Christ and the Christian gospels, which he would almost always quote in his religious meetings, speeches at church, and in public discourses. King’s faith was strongly based in Jesus’ commandment of loving your neighbor as yourself, loving God above all, and loving your enemies, praying for them and blessing them. His nonviolent thought was also based in the injunction to turn the other cheek in the Sermon on the Mount, and Jesus’ teaching of putting the sword back into its place (Matthew 26:52). In his famous Letter from Birmingham Jail, King urged action consistent with what he describes as Jesus’ “extremist” love, and also quoted numerous other Christian pacifist authors, which was very usual for him. In another sermon, he stated:

“Before I was a civil rights leader, I was a preacher of the Gospel. This was my first calling and it still remains my greatest commitment. You know, actually all that I do in civil rights I do because I consider it a part of my ministry. I have no other ambitions in life but to achieve excellence in the Christian ministry. I don’t plan to run for any political office. I don’t plan to do anything but remain a preacher. And what I’m doing in this struggle, along with many others, grows out of my feeling that the preacher must be concerned about the whole man.

—King, 1967″

Rob’s Weekly News Wrap-Up 3/22-3/29

The week began with Attorney General William Barr’s memo, which seemed to imply the Mueller report cleared Trump of all charges. Trump celebrated by going after our health care and depriving Puerto Rico of badly needed resources.

Trump’s “Got Away with Treason” Tour | Real Time with Bill Maher

The week closed with Adam Shiff’s an historic viral take-down of Trump’s Congressional enablers on the GOP side of the House Intelligence Committee, and an Alexandria Cortez MSNBC Town Hall to discuss the Green New Deal as a policy proposal.

It’s refreshing to see Americans engage with each other to solve problems.

I agree with Congressman Schiff: Trump’s corruption is not OK, and neither is the GOP’s.

On a personal note, I had family in town this week. We did some sightseeing but mostly we sat around and talked; I don’t socialize often so it was exhausting. I avoided the news because I was furious with the press for falling for another obvious gaslight, although props to @MSNBC for more accuracy than @CNN or @Fox.

Americans aren’t falling for the gaslight either; 56% still think Trump conspired with Russia.

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Rob’s Weekly Wrap Up 3/8-3/15

This week opened with violence in Venezuela and more stories of wealth and corruption as we learned how wealthy people paid ‘consultants’ to scam their kids into ivy league schools. President Trump produced a budget that cuts Medicare and social security to pay for the wall Mexico will pay for and the courts sentenced Trump’s campaign manager, Paul Manafort, to seven years in prison in two separate trials.

Prosecutors in New York indicted Manafort on state crimes immediately after the second hearing: Trump can’t pardon state crimes. The House and Senate vetoed Trump’s emergency declaration and in New Zealand a white supremacist murdered 43 Muslims as they prayed in their Mosque: his manifesto touted America’s 45th president as inspiration. America’s white supremacists immediately denounced the horrific tragedy as a false flag operation.

As comic relief, old tapes exposed a racist homophobe on Fox as a racist homophobe. I’m still not sure why this is news:

Nancy Pelosi says it’s not worth impeaching trump if she can’t get a bipartisan consensus. I think she is right. Democrats can’t do this alone: the GOP  House and Senate will either do its job or go down for not doing it. What do you think?

The UK is in chaos after the vote on Brexit:

As a FYI, if you’ve heard about the Green New Deal but don’t think you understand what it does, this video offers a possible explanation.

On a personal note, spring arrived; it was a glorious week in San Francisco.

Yesterday a headache became a migraine. I’m still not at 100%, and I made the mistake of trying the new WordPress editor mid-post and it screwed everything up. I apologize for any mistakes in this post.  I’m going to close comments use the rest of the weekend to learn the new editor and fix the post.

I’ll catch up with folks on Monday. Or sooner

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