The Wet Sheets

Warning: this piece contains strong language

A sliver of glass

I leapt

from my Father’s

eye reflecting

a Mother that

didn’t exist.

Cigarette butts rose

to Heaven, thunder

formed my torso.

Dust blew through an

umbilicus and

collected to

form fingers

and lips.

Here is my birth:

In the ghettos of

Charleston my

Daddy beat off

and I coagulated

on the ceiling.

Now bound in

cords of placenta

endorphin seeps

through

my veins

and I breath.

Rob Goldstein – 1986-2019

 

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“Poetry is a way to… make bridges from one country to another, one person to another, one time to another.”

from Art of Quotation

Art of Quotation

“Poetry is a way to bridge, to make bridges from one country to another, one person to another, one time to another.”

Joy Harjo, poet, Named U.S. Poet Laureate (The Oklahoma-born writer, a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, is the first Native American to hold the post.)


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Guilty of Being Sick: Mentally Ill behind bars

The U.S. mental health system treats all mental illness as short-term, easy to solve problems of ‘behavior’.

Most mental health coverage in the U.S. rules out long-term hospital stays, as well as long-term psychotherapy.

For profit psychiatry took the treatment protocols for substance  abuse disorders and decided to use them for everyone, regardless of diagnosis.

I am the first to concede that practicing mindfulness makes life better in general.

But it is not the first line treatment for illnesses that rob the brain of its ability concentrate and use reason.

People sick enough to become homeless need intensive case management and long-term structured treatment facilities.

The ‘prison industry’ wants to fill that need for ‘long term’  treatment.

“Mental health problems are rampant in local jails, often because the illness was a primary factor in the offensive conduct. The cost of caring for and supervising mentally ill inmates makes them two to three times more expensive to house. Once released, they often stop taking their medications, which lands them in trouble with the law and back behind bars.” NYT FEB. 27, 2017

Mental Illness, untreated Behind Bars

Image of an American Flag behind Barbed Wire
Reprocessed Video Grab from Institutionalized-Mental Health Behind Bars by VICE News

An alarming trend has emerged giving private prison profiteers control of person’s fate for life, not just the term of a prison sentence.

The CEOs who built billion dollar empires as partners in ‘tough on crime’ policies are adapting to prison reforms by re branding themselves ‘treatment’ providers.

They see the collapse of our public mental health system as an opportunity
to expand and profit from long-term psychiatric hospitals, civil commitment centers, and ‘correctional’ treatments.

Correct Care Solutions, formerly known as GEO Care, a spin-off of GEO Group, has deep roots in the private prison industry. Although the company has shifted and changed numerous times over the last few years, CCS currently runs seven “treatment” facilities in Florida, Texas and South Carolina, including five mental health facilities and two civil commitment centers.

See more at: Incorrect Care


(c) Rob Goldstein 2017 All Rights Reserved

I do not own the image

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Kevin Cooper #Reviews “Atonement in Bloom”

from Teagan’s Books

Teagan's Books

June 26, 2019

#BookReview! My heart is bloomin’ full!  Musician and author, Kevin Cooper shared his review of the second book in my Atonement, Tennessee series, “Atonement in Bloom.” 

Here’s a link to Kev’s review of Atonement in Bloom.  He was away from blogging for awhile, so please click over to visit Kev for the review — and many other lovely posts about books and music.  Please click over to visit Kev’s blog to see what he had to say about…

Atonement in Bloom

Atonement in Bloom by Teagan Riordain Geneviene Atonement in Bloom

Here’s a snippet of what Kev had to say, but please visit his blog. Click here for Kev’s review.

“… I feel strangely drawn to the little town of Atonement Tennessee, it’s people, and the strange goings on there. It all seems so real to me unlike the places of so many other books I’ve read. I cannot help but…

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