A New U.L.S. member, and a post on 1984 by George Orwell

If you like good literary criticism, you’ll want to read this analysis of George Orwell’s 1984 by Robby Cheadle.

charles french words reading and writing

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Underground Library Society

Thank you to Robbie Cheadle for her post on 1984 by George Orwell. With this entry, Robbie has joined the U. L. s., the Underground Library Society, dedicated to opposing book censorship and book banning. Please visit her blog Robbie’s inspiration .

If a society similar to that depicted in Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury were to somehow come into existence and all books were banned, I would want to be part of any group involved in preserving books. If that meant learning a book off by heart, I would be prepared to do that. The big question for me would be what book to choose.

Out of all the wonderful and amazing books out there, my choice is 1984 by George Orwell. My over view of this book and my reasons as to why I believe it is still relevant to us are as follows:

1984…

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And Now for the Rumors Behind the News

I am taking a blogging break to work on a project.

I’ll be back at the end of September.

In the meantime, enjoy some forgotten greatness.

The Firesign Theater is best known for its biting and complex social commentary.

The group mixed the conventions of radio drama with the recording and writing techniques of The Beatles.

The result was rich multilayered surrealist satire.

“Animals without backbones hid from each other or fell down. Clamasaurs and Oysterettes appeared as appetizers. Then came the sponges which sucked up about ten percent of all life. Hundreds of years later, in the Late Devouring Period, fish became obnoxious.

Trailerbites, chiggerbites, and mosquitoes collided aimlessly in the dense gas. Finally, tiny edible plants sprang up in rows giving birth to generations of insecticides and other small dying creatures. “

An account of evolution from “I Think We’re all Bozos on this Bus” 1971

The group’s most successful album is “Don’t Crush That Dwarf, Hand Me the Pliers.”

Released in 1970, “Don’t Crush That Dwarf, Hand Me The Pliers,” is the story of George Leroy Tirebiter who lives in a world under martial law. Tirebiter is a former child actor who spends his time watching himself on late-night movies, a staple of broadcast television in the 1960’s.

Rolling Stone calls it the greatest comedy record ever made.

‘The Death of Marion Crane’ (c) Rob Goldstein 2014

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Twittering Tales: The Televangelist

The Televangelist

The raging Televangelist stalked the stage like
a angry dragon and roared:

“You will atone for your sins or the god
of vengeance shall surely pierce your heart
with the sword of eternal anguish!”

I rocked the cradle so hard the baby fell into
supper.

226 Characters

© Rob Goldstein 2019

This is an entry for Kat Myrman’s Twittering Tales #151 –– 20 August 2019

Twittering Tales Kat Myrman

 

#Poetry: Gestures

Crazy Mothers, crazy fathers, everyone saving each other,
hysterical calls to cousins who call uncles who call brothers;
from San Francisco to Michigan, everyone knows you’re not
doing well.

I don’t know what Michigan looks like.

I imagine a perfect square.

There are thousands of squares in Michigan called
lawns.

There is a lake: its waters flow from corner to corner.

(c) Rob Goldstein November 08, 1984 All Rights Reserved (Revised 08/26/2019)

To my friends in Michigan. I’ve have seen Michigan. It’s beautiful.