I am not an Animal

I am a human being.

Re-processed digitized image scanned from an oil painting by Eastman Johnson, A Ride for Liberty, The Fugitive Slaves
A Ride for Liberty – The Fugitive Slaves

Do you agree with me?

Still Life with Giorgio de Chirico

It’s Jazz Wednesday’s on Teagan’s Books and
time for another episode of Hulaba Lulu.

Lulu stands at the nexus of Pittura Metafisica
and Metropolis.

 

A Female avatar in 20's attire stands in front of paintings by Giorgio de Chirico and the Robots of Metropolis
The Nexus of Pittura Metafisica and Metropolis.


Pittura Metafisica is one of the words Teagan must
use in the writing of Hulaba Lulu.

For Chapter Seven’s illustrations, I used some of the ideas
of proponents of Pittura Metafisica, such as a dreamlike
juxtaposition of incongruous objects and a disquieting air
of mystery, though I hope my images are more humorous
than disquieting.

 

 

Please enjoy this week’s video and check out Chapter Seven
of Hullaba Lulu!

 

Singin’ in the Bathtub

 

Illustraton staged in Virtual Reality to illustrate Hullab Lulu, image depictts and avatar in a bubble bath bathtub while a robot holds her towel
Singing through the soap suds

Yesterday was Jazz Wednesdays on Teagan’s Books.

Check out Hullaba Lulu and enjoy this short excerpt
from the 1929 danced song, ‘Singin’ in the Bathtub,
performed by Scrappy Landers, written by Michael H.
Cleary.

I’m still dealing with problems keeping me away from my blog.

To my amazing followers, please accept my apologies.

In the meantime:

Illustraton staged in Virtual Reality to illustrate Hullab Lulu, image depictts and avatar in a bathtub while a robot holds her towel
While Singing in the tub

I can yodel opera
Even while i scrub
Everybody’s happy
While singing in the tub

Graphics and Video by Rob Goldstein
Singin’ in the Bathtub
1929 by Michael H. Cleary

Let’s do the Raccoon

Teagan and I are hard at work on this week’s Jazz Wednesdays which means
I have to take a short break from Art by Rob Goldstein to make illustrations.

Several of Teagan’s readers have asked how I make the illustrations for Hullaba Lulu, so here’s a quick explanation: to make these illustrations I use two gaming computers and a virtual reality platform.

Each virtual photo shoot takes about six hours and I usually have to do two shoots to get the images I want.

I use four to six avatars per shoot.

Each avatar must be dressed, posed, and positioned, and getting this right
takes total concentration.

The sets I use must be built or purchased, and modified and sometimes
re-textured.

I take at least five to six gigabytes of high-resolution bitmap files per shoot.

Post-processing also takes concentration because the avatars are usually
distorted in subtle ways, so in that sense I use Photoshop to redraw the scene.

An illustration for Hullaba Lulu made in virtual reality, the image is of a male avatar holding a trumpet to represent the character of valentino
Valentino

This short video is composed of extra shots from the last six shoots for Hullaba Lulu.

Hullaba Lulu – Chapter 1

Hullaba Lulu – Chapter 2

Hullaba Lulu – Chapter 3

Hullaba Lulu – Chapter 4

Hullaba Lulu- Chapter 5.1

Hullaba Lulu – Chapter 5.2

I’ll be back on Wednesday.

I have to go see a man about a dog.

Doin the Raccoon by Rudy Vallee, 1928
Graphics and video by Rob Goldstein (c) 2018