This is What a Christian Looks Like

“Dr. Martin Luther King was pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, when he was twenty-five years old, in 1954. As a Christian minister, his main influence was Jesus Christ and the Christian gospels, which he would almost always quote in his religious meetings, speeches at church, and in public discourses. King’s faith was strongly based in Jesus’ commandment of loving your neighbor as yourself, loving God above all, and loving your enemies, praying for them and blessing them. His nonviolent thought was also based in the injunction to turn the other cheek in the Sermon on the Mount, and Jesus’ teaching of putting the sword back into its place (Matthew 26:52). In his famous Letter from Birmingham Jail, King urged action consistent with what he describes as Jesus’ “extremist” love, and also quoted numerous other Christian pacifist authors, which was very usual for him. In another sermon, he stated:

“Before I was a civil rights leader, I was a preacher of the Gospel. This was my first calling and it still remains my greatest commitment. You know, actually all that I do in civil rights I do because I consider it a part of my ministry. I have no other ambitions in life but to achieve excellence in the Christian ministry. I don’t plan to run for any political office. I don’t plan to do anything but remain a preacher. And what I’m doing in this struggle, along with many others, grows out of my feeling that the preacher must be concerned about the whole man.

—King, 1967″

Twittering Tales: A Midnight Storm

A Midnight Storm

These dark reflections.

Storm clouds gather on a
midnight tear through
San Francisco.

He wants the storm to last
forever; he wants to be
hidden and faceless: dead
without dying.

(c) Rob Goldstein 2019

162 Characters

This is an entry for Kat Myrman’s Twittering Tales #135 – 7 May 2019

Twittering tales Kat Myrman
Twittering Tales Kat Myrman
twittering-tales-weather-phenomenon-4178465_1280.jpg
Weather Phenomenon, Photo by jplenio at Pixabay.com



For Willow.

#WordlessWednesday: The Merry Month of May

It seems there are as many ways of doing “Wordless Wednesday” as there are bloggers.

I define ‘wordless’ as non-verbal, which is why I include music in my #WordlessWednesday post.

I prefer symphonies, and flash mobs because they are wordless examples of
our collaborative genius of as a species.

This Mozart piano concerto, played and conducted by Mitsuko Uchida
makes me proud to belong to the human race.

Her passion is contagious.

Enjoy

Header Image the Merry Month of May (c) Rob Goldstein 2019