Bipolar & Dementia

from Kitt O’Malley

Kitt O'Malley

I fear dementia. Both of my parents have dementia and live in a memory care community. They love one another and seem happy where they are now, but it took a while to make that happen. They wanted to maintain their independence. Understandable.

I fear dementia. Though I hope by avoiding alcohol and taking my bipolar medications, I can stave it off. (Alcohol is a neurotoxin, and I have a family history of alcoholism.)

Still, I fear a downward spiral. That fear I want to overcome. Face it. Stand up to bipolar disorder and dementia. Take care of my brain.

Even if my bipolar disorder progresses, even if I get dementia, I can still love and be loved, just as my parents still love and are loved.

Bipolar Disorder & Dementia Research

Analyzing six studies, researchers concluded  in “History of Bipolar Disorder and the Risk of Dementia: A Systematic Review…

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The last

from Candice Louisa Daquin

TheFeatheredSleep

250px-Scared_Child_at_NighttimeNothing is always a hard and fast rule or outcome

we cannot predict as well as we might think

divining over two sticks to find the source

I know this as I know my own heartbeat

for myself and many others

not having children makes you hold onto yourself too much

you value the debris and memories and fixtures of your past

with emotional microscope, unable to grow beyond reflection

as if they were your child’s blanket, your child’s first tooth

you look at self portraits

feeling the emotion a little less of love approximating love

self-love isn’t always narcissism

it reduces however like a sauce

until there is less than more

while loving another expands

until it lifts us off our feet and sends us into the air

that kind of love frees us from preoccupation

obsessing and writing ourselves over and over

this is my life, this is…

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Recommendations for healing from a distance

from A Feathered Sleep

TheFeatheredSleep

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I told a compassionate jurist once, the recipe for understanding the anxious at heart:

the most disturbing clamor, is that of positivities drum

it beats loudly outside their chamber

be grateful for lifeit proclaims

illuminating sub-text running a ticker tape parade

if you are not grateful you are a bad person

for we know, the anxious will always examine

the inverse and underside

as they themselves are examined and categorized

if you say well at least be glad you are not dead

they will consider all those who seek life

so desperately and why they

who remain unsure at water’s edge

do not perish instead

(take my place! take my place!) (what crimes exist within our fates!)

if you say well, it could be much worse

they will consider all the terrible things that can occur

and condemn themselves for any pain

it is the nature of the anxious…

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What We See of Others Is Often An Illusion

There is a good discussion going on at Dream Big, Dream Often.

Dream Big, Dream Often

We’ve all heard the expression ‘What you see is what you get.’  Well, this is not always true.  One of the most aggravating things about having MS is hearing people say “you don’t look sick.”  As if there is some particular way those living with MS should appear.  I guess I missed the memo.

life

What we see of others is often an illusion.  For some the illusion is self-created to block others out.  For others the illusion is created out of necessity to survive day-to-day.  Regardless of the circumstances it is not always easy to know what is going on with someone internally.  I can say that I am guilty of being quick to make judgements even though I work so hard to fight it.  For some reason it is so easy to assume the person who just changed lanes on me is an idiot.  The truth is I have…

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