The First Lady

from Victo Dolore

Behind the White Coat

Liberty's torch

I put the baby to my breast. She ate greedily.

So tiny for such a strong suck.

He had not come home yet. He did not know that she was a she and not a he. He would be angry, I knew. Would he let me keep her or would he kill her as he had the other three? Would he beat me as he had before?

Look, she is so beautiful, so perfect! Why can’t you love her?

Why can’t you love me?

The midwife busied herself quietly putting the room back in order.

He would never pay for a doctor or a hospital. Not for me, he said. I was not worth it.

A woman.

A girl.

Someday I would leave him. I would run away. Far, far away. But to where? And they would find me, wouldn’t they? They always did. If I was lucky, they would…

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A PRINCESS ON EVERY STREET

from Kendall Person

The Neighborhood

from 1999, TLC with
UNPRETTY

♦♦♦

In honor of Women’s Day, a special encore presentation of…

A Princess on Every Street
written & edited by Kendall F. Person

There is a princess on every street.
We know who they are by their smiling faces,
and silver braces.
We see the pretty dresses that they wear,
and the adorable ponytails arranged of their hair.
We see them skipping down the walk,
headed off to school,
and ready for the world
because they are daddy’s little girl.

There is a princess on every street.
In the broken down apartment buildings,
and in the houses that blot the streets.
We know who they are,
even if they rarely come outdoors
by the songs they sing,
like the sun will come out Tomorrow,
and other wishful things.

There is a princess on every street. Living with abusers
intent on robbing them of a childhood and a future.

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A Chat with the San Francisco Women’s Building

Art by Rob Goldstein
The Women’s Building

I call this post a ‘chat’ with the San Francisco Women’s Building because when I view the mural I feel as if I’m in a conversation about community, personal responsibility, a positive vision of the future, and the joy of creative collaboration.

Art by Rob Goldstein
Creativity

MaestraPeace Mural was painted in 1994 by Bay Area muralists: Juana Alicia, Miranda Bergman, Edythe Boone, Susan Kelk Cervantes, Meera Desai, Yvonne Littleton and Irene Perez.

The mural was fully cleaned and restored in 2012 by the original muralists assisted by a new generation of muralistas.

Art by Rob Goldstein
Padre 2016

The San Francisco Women’s Building is the first community center in the country that is owned and operated by women.

The Mission of the Women’s Building is based on the premise that all women and girls have the right to safe, joyous and creative lives; lives in which they have the right of self-determination.

Art by Rob Goldstein
Madre 2016

I’ve taken hundreds of photos of this mural since 2011.

The photos in this post are the most recent.

Art by Rob Goldstein
Caregivers

 

Art by Rob Goldstein
Music Makes Us Free

 

Art by Rob Goldstein
Earn Your Attitude 2016

 

Art by Rob Goldstein
MaestraPeace

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FEMINIST FRIDAY

Check out the video in this post! You’ll be glad you did!

Haddon Musings

I read this story this week about this amazing woman.  Viola Smith has been called the counterpart of Gene Krupa.  I know that you are going to enjoy getting to know Viola and I have embedded a video of her playing those drums for your enjoyment.  As Viola says:

‘Never lose your groove!’

Viola Smith turns 101 this month. As the oldest member of Local 802, she has an important lesson to teach all of us: never lose your groove!

We have a living legend in our ranks. At 100 years old, Viola Smith – who was one of the first professional female drummers and was called the female Gene Krupa – is probably the oldest active member of Local 802. (In fact, she turns 101 this month, on Nov. 29.) She first joined Local 802 in 1942.

She was born Viola Schmitz in Mount Calvary, Wisconsin, where her father…

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