And Now for the Rumors Behind the News

I am taking a blogging break to work on a project.

I’ll be back at the end of September.

In the meantime, enjoy some forgotten greatness.

The Firesign Theater is best known for its biting and complex social commentary.

The group mixed the conventions of radio drama with the recording and writing techniques of The Beatles.

The result was rich multilayered surrealist satire.

“Animals without backbones hid from each other or fell down. Clamasaurs and Oysterettes appeared as appetizers. Then came the sponges which sucked up about ten percent of all life. Hundreds of years later, in the Late Devouring Period, fish became obnoxious.

Trailerbites, chiggerbites, and mosquitoes collided aimlessly in the dense gas. Finally, tiny edible plants sprang up in rows giving birth to generations of insecticides and other small dying creatures. “

An account of evolution from “I Think We’re all Bozos on this Bus” 1971

The group’s most successful album is “Don’t Crush That Dwarf, Hand Me the Pliers.”

Released in 1970, “Don’t Crush That Dwarf, Hand Me The Pliers,” is the story of George Leroy Tirebiter who lives in a world under martial law. Tirebiter is a former child actor who spends his time watching himself on late-night movies, a staple of broadcast television in the 1960’s.

Rolling Stone calls it the greatest comedy record ever made.

‘The Death of Marion Crane’ (c) Rob Goldstein 2014

Comments are disabled for this post.

Music: Weekly Song Challenge, Week 28

The Rules:

Copy rules and add to your own post, pinging back to Laura’s post.

Post music videos for your answers to the musical questions.

Tag two people to participate!

The Songs:

Post a video of a song that reminds you of a loved one.

“In Your Eyes” by Joan Armatrading reminds me of my Partner.

Post a video of a song that mentions a food or drink.

War -“Spill the Wine”

Post a video of a song that talks about rain or sunshine.

Bill Withers – Ain’t No Sunshine

It took the challenge from willowdot21

Trina: The Shadow Boy Finds the Android

A belated introduction.

The character named Trina first shows up in my work in 1986.

Trina: A Slice of Death

A digital photograph of an avatar that represents an alternate named Trina
The Snake in the Grass

Trina has the power of imagination and uses it to control her world, for this she uses a journal and dolls.

Trina is probably based on the character of the Little Prince by Antoine de
Saint-Exupéry
.

The Little Prince on his Asteroid

A prompt from D. Wallace Peach inspired this new, ongoing fable.

The story begins when Trina meets a little shadow boy In the Land of Tall Thin Shadows and continues with Trina and The Android at Saks. 

‘Trina and the Android at Saks’ closes with the disappearance of a golden android.

The May #PhotoPrompt from Myths of the Mirror
The May photo prompt from Myths of the Mirror

In this section, Trina and the Shadow Boy find the android at Macy’s.


A digital photograph staged in VR depicting a shadow boy standing in front of three robots
The Little Shadow Boy Finds the Android

One day the little Shadow Boy found the golden android on a display stand at Macy’s.

He was giddy with joy and raced to find Trina, who was by the duck pond in Central Park with her doll Madison, and a doll he didn’t know.

The shadow boy paused.

Trina saw his gathering shadow and waved him over.

“I saw him!” cried the little shadow boy.

“Trina gave him a cup of tea, “The android?” she asked.

“ Yes!” grinned the shadow boy.

“Oh yay!” Trina clapped. “Where is he?”

He’s in the robot department at Macy’s,” then the shadow boy
pointed at Trina’s new doll. “Who’s that?

“That’s my new doll, said Trina.

Trina’s new doll smiled.

“What’s her name?” asked the shadow boy.

“I don’t know, do you?”

The little shadow boy cocked his head and thought.

“Her name is Felicity.”

“That sounds right.” Trina replied; then she stuffed Felicity
into her bag and said, “Let’s go!

A photograph staged in VR depicting a little girl and a shadow boy standing in front of three robots
Trina and the Shadow Boy find the Android

The Shadow boy led Trina to the robot department at Macy’s.

The android saw them and clicked happily into gear.

The three of them stared at each other in silence.

Finally, Trina opened her bag and said, “Hop in and I’ll make you a skin.”

The android peered at Trina’s bag and hopped in.

Trina hugged the shadow boy and told him to close his eyes; when he opened them, he was in Trina’s workshop.

The shadow boy watched from the shadows as Trina went to work at her sewing machine. It took hours, but when she was done, the android had a new skin and new clothes.

A digital photograph of a little girl and an android in a workshop for dolls
Trina Takes the Android to Her Workshop

As Trina dressed the android, the shadow boy stepped out of the shadows.

“He’s very handsome.” The shadow boy said, “but why are his clothes so weird.”

He lives in the past.” Trina replied.

Trina brought the android a mirror; the android silently studied his face.

Not bad” he said. His voice was deep and resonant.

“I think it’s quite excellent.” Trina’s statement was an irritable command.

The android clicked with dismay, “Oh yes!” He stammered, “It’s quite excellent; quite excellent indeed.”

Digital photogaph of a little girl in a workship where she makes dolls
Trina Makes the Android a New Skin and Outfit

Trina was happy again.

“Let’s go to the park and write a story.” She said.

“That’s an excellent idea,” the android relied, “quite excellent indeed.”

Words and Illustrations (c) Rob Goldstein 2019