Still Life with Giorgio de Chirico

It’s Jazz Wednesday’s on Teagan’s Books and
time for another episode of Hulaba Lulu.

Lulu stands at the nexus of Pittura Metafisica
and Metropolis.

 

A Female avatar in 20's attire stands in front of paintings by Giorgio de Chirico and the Robots of Metropolis
The Nexus of Pittura Metafisica and Metropolis.


Pittura Metafisica is one of the words Teagan must
use in the writing of Hulaba Lulu.

For Chapter Seven’s illustrations, I used some of the ideas
of proponents of Pittura Metafisica, such as a dreamlike
juxtaposition of incongruous objects and a disquieting air
of mystery, though I hope my images are more humorous
than disquieting.

 

 

Please enjoy this week’s video and check out Chapter Seven
of Hullaba Lulu!

 

And the Women Wicky Wacky, Woo

It’s Jazz Age Wednesdays and time for Chapter 5.2 of Hullaba Lulu
on Teagan’s Books.

For this week’s video, I mixed animation with still shots and set it to
and excerpt from Nagasaki, performed in 1928 by the Ipana Troubadours.

Where are cheeseburgers as good as money?

An illustration for Hullaba Lulu on Teagan's Books that depicts a young women sitting in front of an automat vending machine surrounded by cheeseburgers
Cheeseburgers are as good as money

Jazz Age Wednesdays ― Hullaba Lulu 5.2

 

“Nothin’s gonna be the same.”

At 8:45 AM I was in class to help my teacher get the classroom ready
for the day; I was seven and it was my turn to help with morning chores.

My teacher was in a dither because ‘colored kids’ were coming to school
that day.

Mrs. Sullivan furiously scrubbed the blackboard and muttered under her
breath about ‘niggers’.

I’d never seen any colored kids but heard lots of them lived in
Charleston.

Mrs. Sullivan and I opened the windows so we could clap chalk out the
erasers when through a haze of white dust we saw the first colored kids
arrive at my school.

I smiled and raised my hand to wave but Mrs. Sullivan grabbed my wrist.

Below us, a crowd of white parents formed a barricade with their
kids in front of the entrance; all of them had stones.

The black kids looked scared and paused on the playground, their
parents behind them.

A white man shouted, ‘Go home niggers!’

Then all the parents shouted and threw stones.

A big stone hit a little black girl in the face.

She fell backward and cried.

I felt sad.

I didn’t understand.

White folks said colored people liked their lives.

They said people get along best when they know
their place.

They said colored people want to know their place.

The little black girl’s mother scooped her up and carried her away.

Mrs. Sullivan had tears in her eyes so I asked her why and here is
what she said:

“Nothin’s gonna be the same.”

Rob Goldstein (C) 2018

Rob Goldstein (C) 2018

Jazz Age Wednesdays – Am I Blue

Here’s a 40 second video clip Teagan Geneviene and I came up with for chapter 3 of our collaboration on Teagan’s Books, Hullaba Lulu.

Hullaba Lulu, Chapter 3, Teagan’s Books

A Silent film title card that reads Hullaba Lulu written by Teagan Geneviene and Illustrated by Rob Goldstein