When it is Time to go to the Hospital: 11 Steps to Take Before Admission

Semi-Surreal self portrait in Lavender
Self Portrait in Lavender

This post is specific to people with Dissociative and other Trauma
related disorders.

Some of this information may not apply to you.

I don’t do well in mental health settings.

I don’t look sick.

I don’t look like a ‘mental patient’.

And I expect my treatment providers to be as passionate as I was when
I worked in mental health.

If you have what most people still call multiple personality disorder and
you are about to enter treatment at a Behavioral Health facility it’s a good
idea to prepare.

(1)

Don’t assume that behavioral health professionals are trained psychotherapists. Psychotherapy treats the mind. Behavioral Health
treats targeted behaviors.

 

stand up against stigma, no health without mental health
Stand up against stigma


(2)

If your primary treatment provider is an outside therapist, ask him or
her to communicate your treatment status and history to the facility.

(3)

Confirm that the counselors at the treatment facility have spoken to
your primary therapist when you arrive for your first day.

(4)

Ask if the staff knows how to treat trauma symptoms.

(5)

Do not enable staff ignorance; you have every right to expect your treatment providers to know what they’re treating and to know how to treat it. Speak to the attending psychiatrist if you have concerns. If that fails, make use of grievance procedures to get the most out of your treatment.

(6)

Do treat the staff with respect and consideration. Most people want to do a good job.

(7)
Do tell the staff about suicidal thoughts or self-destructive alternates.

(8)
Discuss your physical health and if one is needed, ask for a physical.

(9)

If you are diabetic or have high blood pressure, ask the staff to monitor your blood pressure and sugar levels. Diabetes and high blood pressure affect mood.

(10)

Ask for a medication assessment.  Mention all unusual side
effects or problems.

(11)

Don’t enter a hospital or day clinic alone. Ask your partner and
friends to call and ask about your progress.  Make sure that you sign
the releases the clinic needs to discuss your case with friends and
family.

More reading:

 

Advocacy for mental health: roles for consumer and family organizations and governments

The Importance of Self-Advocacy in Mental Health Recovery


The Self Advocacy Toolkit

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Quitting Time

Keep an untroubled spirit.

Behind the White Coat

IMG_3677

Amommasview asked if I had ever come close to quitting medicine and if so, what made me keep going?

The answer?

I have come very, very close to quitting only once.

I was in residency and an attending physician made a bad call on a patient. This attending then asked me to do something that I knew was wrong, something that would make the patient’s condition worse. When I refused and explained why, he told me that he would get me fired from the residency program.

There was only three months to go before graduation.

The patient died that night.

It is one thing to make a mistake. It is entirely another to try to make your mistake someone else’s.

Over the following days, the man jeered at me in passing in the hallway. He told everyone who would listen that I was responsible for the death, telling the most…

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Can You Hear Me Now?

This is a courageous post

Accept The Bullshit

On the first of this month, I was discharged from Lancaster General Hospital’s psychiatric unit. I was there for two weeks. It was my twelfth psychiatric hospital stay. Like many people who suffer from long-term mental illness, especially those with chronic suicidal ideation, I am tired. Tired of hospitals, tired of medications, tired of therapists, tired of groups, tired of relapses, and tired of hurting.

This hospitalization was prompted by a drastic increase in the frequency and volume of the voices that I hear in my head. I have had this blog since May of 2013, but despite the voices being a constant part of my life, I have often strayed away from talking about them here. I guess it’s about time.

I first heard them when I was 12 and in sixth grade. I don’t remember much from that time because of the frequent dissociation that clouds a lot…

View original post 685 more words