Veterans Day, 2017 – Who Died?

First posted for Memorial Day, who died is just as relevant on
Veteran’s day.

We best honor the sacrifice of those who died by providing for
the men and women who  fought with them and survived.

‘Who Died’ is a five minute memorial to the young men who died
in the 1944 Invasion of France.

It speaks to the sacrifice of all young men and woman who give
their lives to preserve and protect American democracy.

Written, introduced, and narrated by novelist Betty Smith, author of
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn,” the film answers the question “Who died?”

Betty Smith: “I’ve just been told that over 3,000 of our American boys
died in the first eleven days of the invasion of France.

Who died? I’ll tell you who died.

Not so many years ago, there was a little boy sleeping in his crib. In the night, it thundered and lightninged. He woke and cried out in fear.

His mother came and fixed his blankets and said, ‘Don’t cry. Nothing will
ever hurt you.

He died.”

From the Technique newspaper

‘Who Died?’ – 1945

Description at National Archives: “Designed to sell war bonds, this picture requests the purchase of and retention of war bonds.”

National Archives Identifier: 11823

 

 

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Great-Great Grandfather Knows Best: Who Are the People of America?

A film made in 1953 that explains how the United States came
to be a culturally diverse nation going back to the founding.

The film is not without problems: there is no mention of the
horrors of slavery or the slaughter of indigenous people.

The film was made for children in elementary school who
watched it in an auditorium and returned to their classes
for discussion.

These discussions often included the American Civil War and
America’s struggle to expand the scope and inclusiveness of
civil rights.

This is another film designed to prevent the rise of fascism, which
relies heavily on successfully demonizing immigrants and people
of color.

Published 1953 Usage Public Domain
Found at the Internet Archives

Catching Angels

Catching Angels

Small screen works best with this video.

A Video mash-up made from The Electric Sheep Archives

The soundtrack is a cropped license audio free clip called
Catching Angels. It came from YouTube.

For more about Electric Sheep visit the internet archives

Electric Sheep is a distributed computing project for animating and evolving fractal flames, which are in turn distributed to the networked computers, which display them as a screensaver.

The Electric Sheep Archives

March 27th

March 27th
March 27th

To my friends who celebrate Easter, Happy Easter! To my friends who don’t celebrate Easter, Happy Sunday!

One day, we will put it all behind
We’ll say, that was just another time
We’ll say, that was just another day on Earth

Eno For All
Community Audio