Do you have Draptomania?

An irrational desire for freedom is a symptom of draptomania in people of color.

Screenshot of whites only sign in some God forsaken part of the United States
Drapetomania and over-indulgent whites cause people of color to want equality.

 

Symptoms of drapetomania:

You feel sulky and dissatisfied without cause.

You have a perverse desire for freedom and equality

You suffer a sense of mental alienation in your God
given place as a slave.

You believe you’re as human as any White man.

You abscond from service

In 1850, Doctor Samuel Cartwright, slave doctor from New Orléans,
described a sickness that only affects slaves.

He called it drapetomania: a pathological wish for freedom.

Dr. Cartwright said Negros are ordered by God to live as slaves
to the White man.

He wrote in In Diseases and Peculiarities of the Negro Race that
the Bible commands that a slave be submissive to his master.

When a slave knows and takes his rightful place in the World he is happy
and healthy and unwilling to run away; White man’s burden is keeping
slaves in their happy place.

“If the white man attempts to oppose the Deity’s will, by trying to make the negro anything else than “the submissive knee-bender” (which the Almighty declared he should be), by trying to raise him to a level with himself, or by putting himself on an equality with the negro; the negro will run away.Wikipedia

According to my experience, the “genu flexit”–the awe and reverence, must be exacted from them, or they will despise their masters, become rude and ungovernable, and run away. On Mason and Dixon’s line, two classes of persons were apt to lose their negroes: those who made themselves too familiar with them, treating them as equals, and making little or no distinction in regard to color; and, on the other hand, those who treated them cruelly, denied them the common necessaries of life, neglected to protect them against the abuses of others, or frightened them by a blustering manner of approach, when about to punish them for misdemeanors. Before the negroes run away, unless they are frightened or panic-struck, they become sulky and dissatisfied. The cause of this sulkiness and dissatisfaction should be inquired into and removed, or they are apt to run away or fall into the negro consumption. When sulky and dissatisfied without cause, the experience of those on the line and elsewhere, was decidedly in favor of whipping them out of it, as a preventive measure against absconding, or other bad conduct.

It was called whipping the devil out of them.

Diseases and Peculiarities of the Negro Race, by Dr. Cartwright

 

Re-processed digitized image scanned from an oil painting by Eastman Johnson, A Ride for Liberty, The Fugitive Slaves
A Ride for Liberty – The Fugitive Slaves

The good doctor also prescribed chopping off a big toe.

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
George Santayana

 

 


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Scarlett Ann O’Coulter Says: “Our Blacks are So Much Better than Their Blacks”

Our Blacks are So Much Better Than Their Blacks
Our Blacks are So Much Better Than Their Blacks

As opposed to Obama, who Missy O’Coulter says “is half black, and is not a descendant of the blacks that suffered these Jim Crow laws...

“I am not contesting that he was born in America or anything, but he is the son of a Kenyan not the son of American blacks that went through the American experience.”

In other words, Obama is not as good as “her” blacks because he never had to suffer people like…her.

I made this picture in 2011 when the Clown Princess first mentioned “her” blacks.

I found the picture funny and the comment still relevant in view of the numbers of people who continue to treat African-Americans and the poor in general as if they own them.

RG

President Obama’s Amazing Grace

“He (Reverend Pinckney) embodied the idea that our Christian faith demands deeds and not just words, that the sweet hour of prayer actually lasts the whole week long, that to put our faith in action is more than just individual salvation, it’s about our collective salvation, that to feed the hungry, clothe the naked and house the homeless is not just a call for isolated charity but the imperative of a just society.

What a good man. Sometimes I think that’s the best thing to hope for when you’re eulogized, after all the words and recitations and resumes are read, to just say somebody was a good man.”

“When there were laws banning all-black church gatherers, services happened here anyway in defiance of unjust laws. When there was a righteous movement to dismantle Jim Crow, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. preached from its pulpit, and marches began from its steps.

A sacred place, this church, not just for blacks, not just for Christians but for every American who cares about the steady expansion of human rights and human dignity in this country, a foundation stone for liberty and justice for all.

That’s what the church meant.”

***

According to the Christian tradition, grace is not earned. Grace is not merited. It’s not something we deserve. Rather, grace is the free and benevolent favor of God.

As manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings. Grace — as a nation out of this terrible tragedy, God has visited grace upon us for he has allowed us to see where we’ve been blind.

He’s given us the chance where we’ve been lost to find out best selves. We may not have earned this grace with our rancor and complacency and short-sightedness and fear of each other, but we got it all the same. He gave it to us anyway. He’s once more given us grace. But it is up to us now to make the most of it, to receive it with gratitude and to prove ourselves worthy of this gift. For too long, we were blind to the pain that the Confederate Flag stirred into many of our citizens.

It’s true a flag did not cause these murders. But as people from all walks of life, Republicans and Democrats, now acknowledge, including Governor Haley, whose recent eloquence on the subject is worthy of praise. As we all have to acknowledge, the flag has always represented more than just ancestral pride. For many, black and white, that flag was a reminder of systemic oppression and racial subjugation.

We see that now.

Removing the flag from this state’s capital would not be an act of political correctness. It would not an insult to the valor of Confederate soldiers. It would simply be acknowledgement that the cause for which they fought, the cause of slavery, was wrong.

The imposition of Jim Crow after the Civil War, the resistance to civil rights for all people was wrong.

It would be one step in an honest accounting of America’s history, a modest but meaningful balm for so many unhealed wounds.

It would be an expression of the amazing changes that have transformed this state and this country for the better because of the work of so many people of goodwill, people of all races, striving to form a more perfect union.

By taking down that flag, we express adds grace God’s grace.

But I don’t think God wants us to stop there.

For too long, we’ve been blind to be way past injustices continue to shape the present.

Perhaps we see that now. Perhaps this tragedy causes us to ask some tough questions about how we can permit so many of our children to languish in poverty or attend dilapidated schools or grow up without prospects for a job or for a career.

Perhaps it causes us to examine what we’re doing to cause some of our children to hate.

Perhaps it softens hearts towards those lost young men, tens and tens of thousands caught up in the criminal-justice system and lead us to make sure that that system’s not infected with bias.

That we embrace changes in how we train and equip our police so that the bonds of trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve make us all safer and more secure.

Maybe we now realize the way a racial bias can infect us even when we don’t realize it so that we’re guarding against not just racial slurs but we’re also guarding against the subtle impulse to call Johnny back for a job interview but not Jamal.

So that we search our hearts when we consider laws to make it harder for some of our fellow citizens to vote.

By recognizing our common humanity, by treating every child as important, regardless of the color of their skin.

Or the station into which they were born and to do what’s necessary to make opportunity real for every American. By doing that, we express God’s grace.