When you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice

from musingsofanoldfart

musingsofanoldfart

If you have followed this blog for any length of time, you will know that I love cleverly worded song lyrics. The above title comes from an unexpected source (if you don’t follow the band) – a song called “Free will” by the rock band “Rush.” I find this lyric, penned by drummer Neil Peart, compelling as it speaks to people who choose to do nothing in the face of obvious problems. Martin Luther King saved some of his criticism for the silent people who did not condemn Jim Crow actions.

People choose not to vote because they do not like the choices. But, “none of the above” is not an option and one candidate tends to be worse or represents worse. If you did not vote because you did not think Brexit or Trump would win, you water down your right to protest. And, I would add there are…

View original post 336 more words

Thumbs Up — March For Our Lives!

from Jill Dennison

Filosofa's Word

On Saturday over 800 March For Our Lives events, organized by young people, took place around the globe, from New York to Dallas to Seattle, but also in London, Tokyo, Sydney and Mumbai!  This was not some minor protest that will be forgotten by next week.  Nope, folks, this was a BIG DEAL.  These young people had a message and they sent it loud and clear:  It’s time to stop the gun madness in the U.S. – NOW!!!  I support them 100%, and I am so very proud of anyone and everyone who marched, helped organize or contributed in any way to these events.

Think how amazing this is.  The students who survived the February 14th tragic shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, organized the rally in Washington, D.C. and from there, others picked up the baton and ran with it.  This map shows where…

View original post 775 more words

A Golden Winter’s Blanket

This is a wonderful tribute. I had to share it.

witlessdatingafterfifty

image

This is a memorial for
Martin Luther King, Jr.

The image of love being a blanket
needs to start with the concepts
of Love and Hate.

It starts with MLK, Jr. who compared
hate to “an unchecked cancer.”
He further stated, it “corrodes the
personality and eats away it’s
vital unity.”

Unfortunately, the destructive source
of hatred is often evident in nations,
communities, families and churches.

The opposite of hatred is love, of
course. It is not always an easy
emotion to produce but love is the
antidote for hatred.

A translation of Proverbs 10:12
from “The Message” explains~

“Hatred starts fights, but Love pulls
a blanket (or quilt) over bickering.”

The image of a cozy comforter,
blanket or quilt symbolizes the
soothing impact that loving
words and actions can have
on enemies, as well as friends.

This picture my son, James Matthew,
took of a sunset reminds me of…

View original post 62 more words

Never Forget that Everything Hitler did was Legal


“But if Not” was a sermon delivered by Martin Luther King, Jr. on November 5th 1967.

This excerpt takes up civil disobedience and contains King’s observations  regarding Hitler’s Germany and the power of a tyranny to legalize oppression and murder.

“Never forget that everything Hitler Did was Legal.”

Below is the text from my excerpt.

“Civil disobedience is the refusal to abide by an order of the government or of the state or even of the court that your conscience tells you is unjust. Civil disobedience is based on a commitment to conscience. In other words, one who practices civil disobedience is obedient to what he considers a higher law.

And there comes a time when a moral man can’t obey a law which his conscience tells him is unjust. And I tell you this morning, my friends, that history has moved on, and great moments have often come forth because there were those individuals, in every age in and every generation, who were willing to say

“I will be obedient to a higher law.” These men were saying “I must be disobedient to a king in order to be obedient to the King.” And those people who so often criticize those of us who come to those moments when we must practice civil disobedience never remember that even right here in America, in order to get free from the oppression and the colonialism of the British Empire, our nation practiced civil disobedience.

For what represented civil disobedience more than the Boston Tea Party. And never forget that everything that Hitler did in Germany was legal! It was legal to do everything that Hitler did to the Jews. It was a law in Germany that Hitler issued himself that it was wrong and illegal to aid and comfort a Jew in Hitler’s Germany.

But I tell you if I had lived in Hitler’s Germany with my attitude, I would have openly broken that law. I would have practiced civil disobedience. And so it is important to see that there are times when a man-made law is out of harmony with the moral law of the universe, there are times when human law is out of harmony with eternal and divine laws. And when that happens, you have an obligation to break it, and I’m happy that in breaking it, I have some good company.

I have Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. I have Jesus and Socrates. And I have all of the early Christians who refused to bow.”


“But if Not” concludes with King’s definition of a life with meaning:

I say to you, this morning, that if you have never found something so dear and precious to you that you will die for it, then you aren’t fit to live.

You may be 38 years old, as I happen to be, and one day, some great opportunity stands before you and calls upon you to stand for some great principle, some great issue, some great cause. And you refuse to do it because you are afraid.

You refuse to do it because you want to live longer. You’re afraid that you will lose your job, or you are afraid that you will be criticized or that you will lose your popularity, or you’re afraid that somebody will stab or shoot or bomb your house.

So you refuse to take a stand.

Well, you may go on and live until you are ninety, but you are just as dead at 38 as you would be at ninety.

And the cessation of breathing in your life is but the belated announcement of an earlier death of the spirit.

You died when you refused to stand up for right.

You died when you refused to stand up for truth.

You died when you refused to stand up for justice.”


The whole sermon is available here: The Internet Archives