Dissociative Identity Disorder: The Positives and Negatives

People have described me as flaky, high maintenance, difficult, hysterical, confusing, compulsive, and dishonest.

That last one, dishonest, is a common reaction to people with DID.

If I wanted to fake an illness I’d choose something people would believe

People tend to go with what makes the most sense based on what they know.

Most people know nothing about the mind, much less states of minds.

The other wordson that list are alternate descriptions of the symptoms of DID.

Gaps in memory look flaky, but they’re more than forgetting. These gaps
are the same as not knowing.

High maintenance means I require more medical supports and more patience from friends and family.

Panic attacks look like hysteria.

Personality switches are confusing because my alternates have different interests.

However, the words people use aren’t all negative.

People also describe me as, loving, intelligent, empathetic, compassionate, loyal, strong, and honest.

That last, honest, means I say what I think is true based on what I know or think I know.

The goals of treatment for dissociative identity disorder

My ultimate goal in life is to be a good person; it’s an ongoing project and a choice I have to make every day.

What are the words people use to describe you?

Rob Goldstein 2019

This is a companion to a previous post; ‘A Lifetime’

Writing: What Would You Do?

On January 1, I boldly announced I would publish a book of poems this year and here it is, the middle of August and I’m stymied.

I see my writer friends spontaneously publish and I think OMG, I’m such a loser.

I suppose I should congratulate myself, this month marks nine years of intensive psychotherapy, though when I watch a trump crowd, I wonder why I bother.

Psychodynamic psychotherapy is hard work.

Why is it crazy to think eight rather nice people live in my body when we have a crazy ass president like trump? But I digress.

This struggle to publish is the current topic of therapy.

How do I publish a collection of poems when I don’t recognize the work as mine.

Some the folks who follow this blog see the DID and others don’t.

I assume most people don’t see it.

One idea is to hire a psychotherapist/writer/editor.

In Friday’s session, my therapist suggested I give the alternates credit
for their work.

When I collaborated with Teagan on Hullaba lulu, I had to tell her which
alternate staged which scene.

Is it as simple as giving the alternates credit for their work?

What if I published the book as an anthology, as if the alternates are different writers?

I stopped letting them use their own names in 2013 because it encouraged fragmentation, but I’m healthier now.

I know it’s difficult for most people to understand DID, but what would you do?

Rob Goldstein 2019

Rob Goldstein: Featured on Beyond Your Past

I’m proud that I’m this week’s featured podcast on Beyond Your Past.

I have a multiplicity of conflicting opinions about everything including
my diagnosis.

These conflicts manifest as a pattern of symptoms that affect productivity.

Learning to cope with these symptoms is a primary treatment goal.

This is the core of this week’s podcast with Matt Pappas.

Dissociative Identity Disorder: Do Your Alters Agree with the Diagnosis of DID?

2011 Blackerry shot of a graffiti mural in San Francisco's Mission District
Campos

 

The Beyond Your Past Podcast is hosted by Certified Life Coach, NLP Master Practitioner, and Mental Health Advocate, Matthew Pappas. He is also the founder of SurvivingMyPast.net, a blog in support of all who have survived the Trauma of Abuse.

 

Beyond your past is a great resource for people with C-PTSD and other trauma related symptoms.

‘Portrait of Rob Goldstein #25’ and Campos (c) Rob Goldstein 2019