Would you take a knee?

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In my rather compromised memory, there was a time when about the only time I heard the National Anthem was at the beginning of a rodeo. Then of course, I was exposed to other sporting events, like high school, college, and pro football. And of course the anthem is prevalent at the international competition of the Olympic Games.

The Anthem has the ability to move me to tears. I confess that I bought into the old-school notion that Francis Scott Key wrote the anthem to honor the bravery of our young armed services in their battle for independence from England. In addition to the imagery of the flag waving amid smoldering ramparts, the song also takes me back to that time in my youth when my pony and I tried valiantly to keep up with the big horses as they snaked expertly around the dusty arena to the rousing Stars…

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Great-Great Grandfather Knows Best: It’s Your America, 1945

It’s Your America (Part 2)  1945
U.S. War Office

An American soldier puzzles over what it means to be an American as he observes the enemy and interacts with the other men in of his platoon.

“When we were kids we never thought much about freedom or liberty, maybe that’s because we had so much of it.”

Released in 1945 but made while U.S. Forces were still in combat,An American soldier, realizes the greatness of his country and determines to assume the share of responsibilities of good citizenship upon his return to civilian life.

The U.S. War Department

“The structure of world peace cannot be the work of one man, or one party,
or one nation…it must be a peace which rests on the cooperative effort of
the whole world.”

Franklin Delano Roosevelt  March 1, 1945

 

Norman Rockwells Four Freedoms, Freedom of Worship
Each according to the dictates of his own Conscience.

 

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Great-Great Grandfather Knows Best: Who Are the People of America?

A film made in 1953 that explains how the United States came
to be a culturally diverse nation going back to the founding.

The film is not without problems: there is no mention of the
horrors of slavery or the slaughter of indigenous people.

The film was made for children in elementary school who
watched it in an auditorium and returned to their classes
for discussion.

These discussions often included the American Civil War and
America’s struggle to expand the scope and inclusiveness of
civil rights.

This is another film designed to prevent the rise of fascism, which
relies heavily on successfully demonizing immigrants and people
of color.

Published 1953 Usage Public Domain
Found at the Internet Archives